on racialization, wow, and virtual worlds

I found Nakamura’s notion that virtual worlds can be expressions of utopian desire extremely interesting considering the prevalence and predominance of racist representation within WoW communities, machinima videos, and other viral content. Though she does mention in her conclusion that a work does not need to be free of racially antagonistic representations to be a … Continue reading on racialization, wow, and virtual worlds

Non-Utopian Game Space

I’d like to briefly return to a couple questions that emerged in our class discussion yesterday on the Nakamura article and Sleep Dealer.  To paraphrase, Patrick asked us to think about the tendency for virtual worlds to be thought of as a utopic space that seems to inevitably collapse back into a resemblance or a … Continue reading Non-Utopian Game Space

Sleep Dealer: Labour, memory and embodiment

The film Sleep Dealer raises some provocative questions about the relationship between labour and embodiment. The film almost hyperbolically literalizes the Marxist theory of alienation by which the worker’s identity as a sovereign individual is severed from her labour; the “sleep dealers” quite literally cannot see the product or the process of their labour. Marx’s treatise, while expanding … Continue reading Sleep Dealer: Labour, memory and embodiment

Wonder-world Swung Open: Moby-Dick as Setting the Stage for Digital Age Narrative

Matt Kish *Before we dive into transnational digital studies this week (11/24-11/26), I wanted to write briefly on the changing state and forms of narrative as follow-up to our examination of electronic literature.-TC In 1851, Herman Melville published Moby-Dick; or, The Whale. Most people immediately dismissed the work as another high sea adventure yarn, a genre … Continue reading Wonder-world Swung Open: Moby-Dick as Setting the Stage for Digital Age Narrative

Electronic Literature vs Literature: Battle Royale

At a basic grammatical level, “electronic literature” is a term that exists in relation to a prior term, “literature”. While electronic literature doesn’t necessarily stand in opposition to what we think we understand literature to be, it does deliberately differentiate itself. Janey Murray calls out four characteristics of “digital environments” that hypothetically set them apart from analog environments … Continue reading Electronic Literature vs Literature: Battle Royale